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Edward Curtis Collection

Mosa Mojave by Curtis             Quilcene Boy by Edward Curtis

"Mosa Mojave" and "Quilcene Boy" by Edward Curtis

Edward Curtis Collection

Below you will find a selection of Vintage and Re-strike photogravures from the collection of  Edward Curtis. The following photogravures are available for sale. Click on image to see larger version. (Please set your browser to allow popup windows for this purpose.) If your browser does not support JavaScript, you may view a page containing all of the larger versions of this artist's work by clicking here. Please note that the images here are greatly compressed for Internet viewing and the originals are of much higher quality.

Contact us for further information on these pieces or to request other items of interest.



The Three Chiefs Piegan by Curtis "The Three Chiefs- Piegan"

Vintage photogravure, 1900, H x W, antique frame 

"Three proud old leaders of their people. A picture of the primal upland prairies with their waving grass and limpid streams. A glimpse of the life and conditions which are on the verge of extinction." [Ref.: "The North American Indian"] 


The Vanishing Race by Curtis
"The Vanishing Race"

Re-strike photogravure, 1904, H x W, Unframed

"The thought which this picture is meant to convey is that the Indians as a race, already shorn of their tribal strength and stripped of their primitive dress, are passing into the darkness of an unknown future. Feeling that the picture expresses so much of the thought that inspired the entire work, the author has chosen it as the first of the series." [Ref.: "The North American Indian"] 


Geronimo by Curtis
"Geronimo"

Re-strike photogravure, 1907, H x W, Unframed

"This portrait of the historical old Apache was made in March, 1905.According to Geronimo's calculation he was at the time seventy-six years of age, thus making the year of his birth 1829. The picture was taken at Carlisle, Pennsylvania, the day before the inauguration of President Roosevelt, geronimo being one of the warriors who took part in the inaugural parade at Washington. he appreciated the honor of being one of those chosen for this occasion, and the catching of his features while the old warrior was in a retrospective mood was most fortunate." [Ref.: "The North American Indian"] 


The Storm by Curtis
"The Storm"

Re-strike photogravure, 1906, H x W, Unframed

"A scene in the high mountains of Apache-land just before the breaking of a rainstorm." [Ref.: "The North American Indian"] 


Jicarilla Maiden by Curtis
"Jicarilla Maiden"

Re-strike photogravure, 1904, H x W, Unframed

"This picture (shows) exceedingly well the typical Jicarilla's woman's dress: a cape of deerskin, beaded, a broad belt of black leather, a deerskin skirt, and the hair fastened on each side of the head with a large knot of yarn or cloth."  [Ref.: "The North American Indian"] 


Canon del Muerto by Curtis
"Canon del Muerto"

Re-strike photogravure, 1904, H x W, Unframed

"This "Canon of the Dead" is a branch of The Canon de Chelly, deriving its name from having been the scene of a massacre of a band of Navaho by a troop of Mexican soldiers." [Ref.: "The North American Indian"] 


Son of the Desert by Curtis
"Son of the Desert"

Re-strike photogravure, 1904, H x W, Unframed

"In the early morning this boy, as if springing from the earth itself, came to the author's desert camp. Indeed, he seemed a part of the very desert. His eyes bespeak all of the curiosity, all the wonder of his primitive mind striving to grasp the meaning of the strange things about him."
[Ref.: "The North American Indian"] 


Pima Baskets by Curtis
"Pima Baskets"

Re-strike photogravure, 1904, H x W, Unframed

"The baskets made by the Pima, Papago, and Qahatika, as well as by their Maricopa neighbors, are practically identical in formand design, but the Mariciopa basketry is of somewhat superior workmanship. The four-armed cross, a form of the swastika, appears as a central feature in the decoration of a majority of the Piman and Maricopa baskets of today and while the true signification here is not known with certainty, it is not impossible that it was designed orginally to represent the winds of the four cardinal directions. Less than a generation ago the swastiska was employed by the Pima to decorate their shields, and as a brand for their horses." [Ref.: "The North American Indian"] 


Facade-San Xavier by Curtis
"Facade-San Xavier del Bac Mission"

Re-strike photogravure, 1907, H x W, Unframed

"The Papago [branch of the Pima] certainly proved tractable enough, under the efforts of the Franciscans, to build one of the most beautiful mission churches of the United States, and while all similar edifices of the region have fallen into decay, they have kept this wonderful old structure at San Xavier del Bac in a good state of preservation." [Ref.: "The North American Indian"] 


Qahatika Girl by Curtis
"Qahatika Girl"

Re-strike photogravure, 1907, H x W, Unframed

"In appearance and habits the Qahatika are almost identical with their immediate congeners the Pima and the Papago. Many years ago, they say, the Pima were living in Akichinh, near the Picacho, when a large party of Apache made war on them and drove them away. The greater part went to the Gila and established the settlement at Sacaton; others, the ancestors of the Qahatika, went into the desert and made their homes there." [Ref.: "The North American Indian"] 


Mosa Mohave by Curtis
"Mosa-Mohave"

Re-strike photogravure, 1903, H x W, Unframed

"It would be difficult to conceive of a more thorough aboriginal than this Mohave girl. Her eyes are those of the fawn of the forest, questioning the strange things of civilization upon which it gazes for the first time. She is such a type as Father Garces may have viewed on his journey through the Mohave country in 1776." [Ref.: "The North American Indian"] 


An Oasis in the Bad Lands by Curtis
"An Oasis in the Bad Lands"

Re-strike photogravure, 1905, H x W, Unframed

"This picture was made in the heart of the Bad Lands of South Dakota. The subject is the sub-chief Red Hawk, a sketch of whose life is given on page 188 of Volume III."
[Ref.: "The North American Indian"] 


A Hopi Man by Curtis

"A Hopi Man"

Re-strike photogravure, 1905, H x W, Unframed


Slow Bull - Ogallala by Curtis


"Slow Bull - Ogallala"

Re-strike photogravure, 1907, H x W, Unframed


Red Cloud - Ogallala by Curtis


"Red Cloud-Ogallala"

Re-strike photogravure, 1905, H x W, Unframed


In the Bad Lands by Curtis
"In the Badlands"

Re-strike photogravure, 1904, H x W, Unframed

"This striking picture was made at Sheep Mountain in the Bad Lands of Pine Ridge reservation, South Dakota." [Ref.: "The North American Indian"] 


On the Little Bighorn by Curtis
"On the Little Bighorn"

Re-strike photogravure, 1905, H x W, Unframed

"This picturesque camp of the Apsaroke was on the Little Bighorn river, Montana, a short distance below where the Custer fight occurred." [Ref.: "The North American Indian"] 
The Dance by Poppie
"The Three Chiefs- Piegan"

Re-strike photogravure, 1900, H x W, Unframed

"Three proud old leaders of their people. A picture of the primal upland prairies with their waving grass and limpid streams. A glimpse of the life and conditions which are on the verge of extinction." [Ref.: "The North American Indian"] 


Quilcene Boy by Curtis
"Quilcene Boy"

Re-strike photogravure, 1912, H x W, Unframed

"The Quilcene, like the Skokomish, are a band of Twana living on Hoods Canal, Washington." [Ref.: "The North American Indian"]


Canyon de Chelly by Curtis
"Canyon de Chelly"

Re-strike photogravure, 1905, H x W, Unframed


The Zuni Governor by Curtis


"The Zuni Governor"

Re-strike photogravure, 1905, H x W, Unframed



For further information on any of these works or to request works by artists not shown here, please contact us.

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